Barrington Court NT

What a wonderful day at Barrington Court.  The weather was perfect with blue skies, a dash of light white cloud and a slight breeze, all of which contributed to the most vibrant colour in the gardens… well it was just one of those perfect days.  Words cannot effectively describe what we found there, I will let my photos do the talking.  So without further ado let the pictures roll……

Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher
Picture by Terry Fisher

My image of the day however is this black and white taken in the Buss Stalls (calf pens)

Picture by Terry Fisher

More photos of Barrington taken at various times of the year can be viewed here: Terry Fisher Photography

Full details of the house, gardens etc. can be viewed here:  National Trust

Terry Fisher Photography

Capture and Preserve Your Memories

Birds

If you have ever attempted to photograph Swallows, House Martins or Swifts in flight you will know how difficult it is to get a sharp image so I am very pleased with the two images at the bottom of this post:

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Birds--3

Birds--4

Birds-

Terry Fisher Photography
Capture and Preserve Your Memories

Chartwell Garden Photography

Having made an unexpected stop at the National Trust property at Chartwell (home of the late Winston Churchill) I realised I only had with me a 70-200 zoom lens, a Canon 1d mark iv body and no means of camera support (tripod, monopod etc). This was not an ideal set up for shooting buildings or gardens! But, being up for a challenge I decided to see what I could do. All the following images (only a sample of those taken) were taken hand held. Hope you like them!

Chartwell-

Chartwell-3193

Chartwell-3158

Chartwell-3146

Chartwell-3142

Chartwell--8

Terry Fisher Photography
Capture and Preserve Your Memories

Falconer Display

Falconer displays are always very popular, non more so than those of  Tony Bryant  (Raptorcare).  These images are some of those taken at the recent display at the Templecombe Medieval Pageant.

Falcon-01

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Terry Fisher Photography
Capture and Preserve Your Memories

The Tawny Owl

The Tawny Owl is the UK’s largest breeding owl. It is an owl the size of a pigeon and has a rounded body and head, with a ring of dark feathers around its face surrounding the dark eyes. It is mainly reddish brown above and paler underneath. It is found throughout Britain (with the exception of Ireland), most of Europe & Russia (though not the more northerly regions) through to Asia & China & some of the north of Africa.
The Tawny Owl is nocturnal, roosting during the daytime in trees. It mainly preys on small rodents & roosting birds. Small invertebrates, including worms, will get eaten too. It is believed that they will also take fish out of garden ponds, when there is a scarcity of other food. Although normally silent in flight, Tawny Owls have been observed flying low over hedgerows beating their wings to disturb & flush out their prey, particularly roosting songbirds.

Tawny Owls live mainly in wooded areas, using holes in trees as nests, rather than building their own. Sometimes they will use old squirrel drays. They have also been known to use old nests or nest on the ground, if no other suitable nest sites are available. They will also nest in suburban gardens. They can be aggressive & have been known to attack humans in defence of their nests.
A pair of Tawny Owls will produce only one brood per year, laying between 2 – 5 egg starting around the beginning to middle of March, with up to a week between each egg. Incubation starts with the first egg, which means that the eggs hatch at different times (incubation period is around 28-30 days). Once hatched, both parents are involved in feeding, until the young are forced to leave at about 2-3 months old. The young are capable of flying from around 5 weeks after hatching.